Books by the Banks is here!

posted in: David's Blog | 0

One of the things I treasure about fall in Ohio is the number of events celebrating books and authors that happen around the state. Book fairs and festivals, poetry readings, writing workshops – there is something going on every week, and sometimes almost every day!

Tomorrow (Saturday, October 28) is one of the biggest and best of all: the 2017 Books by the Banks: Cincinnati Regional Book Festival, presented by Ohio Humanities at the Duke Energy Convention Center from 10 to 4. Free and open to the public, the event features national, regional, and local authors and illustrators; book signings; panel discussions; and activities for the entire family to enjoy.

Ohioana will be there, too – be sure to stop by our table and get a free copy of the Ohioana Quarterly and other goodies! For more info, visit: http://booksbythebanks.org/  We’ll see you in Cincinnati!

An Ohio Halloween

posted in: History, Holidays | 0

BOO! Did we scare you? Just a little?

It’s that time of year, when pumpkins get carved into jack-o-lanterns and everyone dresses up in great costumes to pretend to be someone (or something) else for a day. There’s plenty of scary stuff right here in Ohio, and fun stuff too — and serious stuff.

A recent article in the Columbus Dispatch, written by Nancy Gilson, featured the work of James Willis. James chases folklore, ghosts stories, and ghosts. He’s the author of three perfect Halloween books: Weird Ohio, The Big Book of Ohio Ghost Stories, and the most recent offering, Central Ohio Legends & Lore. You can follow him on Twitter at @GhostsofOhio to get all of the latest and greatest.

There’s plenty of book offerings in the category of cemeteries in Ohio as well, like Buried Beneath Cleveland: Lost Cemeteries of Cuyahoga County, by Wiliam Krejci. So if you are troubled by poltergeists, it could be that your house or your business is built over the top of a graves that didn’t get moved. Cemeteries that aren’t hidden  are spooky and creepy, for sure, and in older ones if you walk across the grave, the ground might sink under your feet a bit (so DON’T DO THAT! OMG!). But cemeteries  are also full of stories, and one of the few places that ordinary people can be memorialized for posterity.

So if you are looking for spooky thrills on the 31st, check the local paper and see if there’s still time to find a corn maze, a haunted tour, or that perfect pumpkin ready for carving!

 

The 76th Ohioana Awards

posted in: Awards | 0

 

Ohioana award winners, L to R:  Marisa Silver, Douglas Brinkley, Teri Ellen Cross Davis, C.F. Payne, Tiffany McDaniel, Ohioana Executive Director David Weaver, Ashley Bethard, and Sally Derby

What a great night! Food, friends, music, awards — and BOOKS! Once again, we gathered in the Atrium of the Ohio Statehouse to honor the recipients of one of the oldest state literary awards in the nation. We were only missing author and speaker J.D. Vance, who had a previous engagement, but he created a wonderful video for us.

There was a surprise video visit, however, from author and Governor John Kasich, who showed his appreciation for the authors and for the literary heritage of the state.

Here are our awardees and their books:

Juvenile Literature: C.F. Payne, Miss Mary Reporting. Sponsor: Margaret
W. Wong & Associates
Middle Grade/Young Adult Literature: Sally Derby, Jump Back, Paul
Reader’s Choice: Tiffany McDaniel, The Summer That Melted Everything
About Ohio or an Ohioan: J.D.Vance, Hillbilly Elegy. Sponsor:
Huntington Bank
Poetry: Terry Ellen Cross, Haint. Sponsor: Ohio Arts Council/Poetry Out
Loud
Fiction: Marisa Silver, Little Nothing. Sponsor: Vorys, Sater, Seymour &
Pease LLP
Nonfiction: Douglas Brinkley, Rightful Heritage. Sponsor: Porter Wright

Thanks to all who attended and THANK YOU to our wonderful sponsors:

Awards: 

The Columbus Foundation

Huntington

Ohio Arts Council

Vorys

Event:

Honda

Porter Wright

Table Sponsors:

Crabbe Brown James

Ice Miller

Margaret W. Wong & Associates

Media Associates and In-Kind:

Ohio Channel

Ohio Magazine

90.5 WCBE

PXP Ohio

 

 

 

 

 

The Big Give!

posted in: Support, The Big Give | 0

 

“I am really grateful because I know the people who have won [the Walter Rumsey Marvin Grant] in the past go on to do bigger and better things.”

Negesti Kaudo, 2015 Walter Rumsey Marvin Grant winner congratulated by Steven Moore of the Columbus Foundation.

 

 

Every day Ohioana Library works to connect readers and Ohio writers. Serving over 150,000 people a year, Ohioana celebrates Ohio’s creativity through its festival and awards while collecting and preserving the state’s rich literary heritage.

Your donation will make a BIG difference! And thanks to The Big Give, it will go farther.  From 10 a.m. Tuesday, October 10th to 12 noon Wednesday, October 11th, your gift will be amplified courtesy of a $1.3 million bonus pool.

Donations help Ohioana continue outreach to children and underrepresented populations, keep the largest festival on Ohio literature free, and provide encouragement to up-and-coming authors like Negesti Kaudo and now Pulitzer Prize Winner Anthony Doerr.

Donating during The Big Give is simple!

VISIT beginning at 10 a.m. October 10.
GIVE securely using a major credit card with a minimum gift of $20.
CELEBRATE as you’ve made a real difference!

All gifts must be made using a credit card or through a Columbus Foundation Donor Advised Fund on The Columbus Foundation’s website.

If you have any questions, please contact Ohioana Executive Director David Weaver at 614-466-3831 or dweaver@ohioana.org.

Thank you for ensuring Ohio’s literary legacy thrives and that authors like Negesti and Anthony can connect with people like you.

Sincerely,
David Weaver

Celebrate Banned Books!

posted in: readiing | 0

Books are banned for all kinds of reasons. They might contain graphic depictions of sexuality or violence, or they might be considered unsuitable for younger readers. The language might be offensive to some or the ideas might not fit with the community in which the book is being read (or not read). It’s not always about one group of people trying to make sure that another group of people isn’t going to have any fun — sometimes the reasons that people object are more complicated or nuanced.

Ohio has its share of banned books. Beloved by Toni Morrison is a perpetual favorite. Our own Margaret Peterson Haddix made it on the list in 2005 for Don’t You Dare Read This, Mrs. Dunphrey. Libraries face the brunt of challenges and parents are the greatest group of challengers.

In this day and age of internet access and digital download, the thought of completely banning a book seems quaint or even impossible. And it seems like banning something just creates a large virtual HEY READ THIS!!! sign post.

Celebrate the week in the way you best see fit! Read something banned!

Ten years ago

posted in: Ohioana Book Festival | 0

It’s a day of nostalgia for us at Ohioana because ten years ago today, September 15, 2007, the very first Ohioana Book Festival was presented, “A ‘Good Roots’ Celebration,” based on the book edited by Lisa A. Watts and published by Ohio University Press & Swallow Press. Ten contributors to the book, including Lisa, came to Columbus for that inaugural event. Pictured here: (l-r seated) Anthony Doerr, Jill Bialosky, Scott Russell Sanders, Jill Salamon, Lisa A. Watts, Michael Dirda, and Elizabeth Dodd; standing l-r, Dale Keiger, James Toedtman, and Dan Cryer.

The picture was taken in the State Library of Ohio, which has been painted and primed and re-carpeted and improved over the past 10 years.

We couldn’t have done it without our supporters, who came in with gifts so that we could support our authors and have an all-around great celebration. We had a party at the Governor’s Residence afterword — and then we did it all again in  May of 2008 in order to get on track and keep the festival in the spring!

We had a lot to learn but learn we did. No one could’ve predicted then that a decade later the event would draw over 120 authors, 3,000-plus attendees and be the state’s largest celebration of Ohio books and authors.

 

 

 

 

September workshops for writers in Columbus

posted in: Writing | 0

There are two great opportunities for area writers coming up this month, and there’s still time to register!

The Thurber House, where laughter, learning, and literature meet, begins its adult two-session writing workshops on September 11 with Revise Like a Rock Star. Deadline for registrations is soon: September 4. 

SICCO (Sisters in Crime Columbus Ohio), the local chapter of Sisters in Crime, an international organization promoting women in crime writing, is  hosting a day-long forensics writing workshop on Sept. 23. The event is at the lodge at Blacklick Woods Metro Park.

Ohio author Andrew Welsh-Huggins is the keynote speaker along with a U.S. marshal, a state crime investigator and a Columbus police detective. Registration is $60, which includes breakfast, lunch and a reception at day’s end. Buy tickets here.

Announcing an evening of fun and books: The 2017 Ohioana Awards!

posted in: Awards | 0

Join us for one of Ohioana’s most elegant evenings: the 76th Ohioana Awards on October 6.

We’ll gather in the Statehouse Atrium on Friday, October 6,  from 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. and honor our writers and Ohioana’s grand tradition of recognizing some deserving and creative people.

Tickets are $50 and available for purchase. The cost includes wine and hors d’oeuvres. The Awards Ceremony is always a good time for everyone, and we hope you’ll join us!

This year’s event includes winners in seven categories:

Fiction
Marisa Silver, Little Nothing, Blue Rider Press.

Nonfiction
Douglas Brinkley, Rightful Heritage: Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Land of America, Harper.

About Ohio or an Ohioan
J.D. Vance, Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis, Harper.

Juvenile Literature
C.F. Payne (illustrator) and Sue Macy (author), Miss Mary Reporting: The True Story of Sportswriter Mary Garber, Paula Wiseman Books.

Middle Grade/Young Adult Literature
Sally Derby, Jump Back Paul, Candlewick.

Poetry
Teri Ellen Cross Davis, Haint: Poems, Gival Press.

Reader’s Choice
Tiffany McDaniel, The Summer That Melted Everything, St. Martin’s Press.

 

 

 

By kids, for kids, courtesy of reviewers at the Columbus School for Girls

For several years now, the Ohioana Quarterly has benefited from the help of a special group of reviewers: students at the Columbus School for Girls. The girls at CSG have provided their unique insights and kid-focused opinions to give us some much-appreciated reviews of all kinds of books. We also appreciate the work of their teachers, Charlotte Stiverson and Tracy Kessler, who help pair the books with the reviewers and provide direction. It’s a true win-win for all! Charlotte is also an author, and you can find her book, Nellie’s Walk, at Amazon.com as well as other stores where books are sold.

Houts, Michelle. Winterfrost. Candlewick (Somerville MA) 2014 HB $16.99

Winterfrost by Michelle Houts is a Danish fantasy book about a 12-year-old girl named Bettina and her baby sister Pia. It is an average Christmas on the Larsen family farm when they suddenly find out that their mormor (grandma) had hurt her hip and was in the hospital. Their dad is visiting their uncle and their mom needs to go to the hospital for their mormor so the kids are home alone for about a week. In all the commotion, they forget to put out the traditional rice pudding for their nisse (which are like elves or gnomes). Their nisse, Klarkke, gets upset and makes some mischief around the barn. That day when Bettina puts baby Pia outside to nap and get some fresh air something terrible happens. Klarkke takes baby Pia! He takes her to his Uncle Gammel’s house and leaves her at the bottom of the tree were his house is. While Klarkke is inside talking to his uncle, a wayward nisse comes along and takes Pia with him. Will Bettina be able to go on the adventure to get her baby sister before her parents get home? Read the book to find out.

The book was interesting and well written. It could be very suspenseful at some points. Winterfrost has some tough vocabulary and Danish sayings like mormor (grandma), mor (mom), farfar(grandpa), far(dad), and Danish songs that can be hard to understand. I would recommend this book to kids fourthgrade and older. This was a really interesting book.

Reviewed by Katherine Niven, Mrs. Kessler’s class, Columbus School for Girls.

 

Kennedy, Anne Vittur. The Farmer’s Away! Baa! Neigh! Candlewick Press (Somerville MA) 2014 HB $15.99.

The Farmer’s Away is a book written by Anne Vittur Kennedy. The Farmer’s Away is a silly, fun book about animals who can’t wait until their farmer leaves so that they can do some things you normally wouldn’t see an animal do, such as water skiing an having a picnic. In this book, the animals put clothing on together and they laugh and giggle. However, when the farmer returns, all of the animals run back to their stalls and throw off their clothes so that the farmer will never know what kind of day they had.
I think that this book would be good for children ages 3-5 because the pictures are bright, and the words are easy to read, and you can really get what is going on. This book is good for kids who like farm animals, and I hope that sometime you will be able to sit down and enjoy the book!

Book review by Sammy Kleinman, in Ms. Kessler’s fourth grade class, at Columbus School for Girls.

 

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