One for the record books!

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The 11th annual Ohioana Book Festival is now part of history!

From the people eagerly waiting to get in before the doors opened, the large and enthusiastic crowds at many panel discussions, the huge number of kids and teens in their special spaces, the lines of people waiting to check out at The Book Loft, and the fact that our two food trucks (Sweet T’s and Schmidt’s) sold COMPLETELY out of food before their scheduled end time – all signs point to this being our biggest and best-attended festival ever!

Ohioana’s tagline is “Connecting readers and Ohio writers,” and no event exemplifies that better than the Ohioana Book Festival. We had 120 authors of all genres as well as illustrators, all with an Ohio connection. Either their books were about Ohio or the individuals have called Ohio home at some point.

We love it. And it’s FREE! Always has been, always will be.

Please be on the look-out for next year (which will be here before you know it!) The date is Saturday, April 14, 2018.

 

Ohioana Book Festival

posted in: Ohioana Book Festival | 0

It’s here! Hope you have time on Saturday to join us for the Ohioana Book Festival! It’s free!

This is the 11th one, and we’re just as thrilled and psyched for this event as we were for the first one in 2007!

(Isn’t the poster fantastic? It’s the creation of Lindsay Ward. She’s going to be at the festival too!)

Come to the Sheraton in downtown Columbus any time from 10:30 in the morning to 5:00 p.m. on Saturday, April 8. We’ll have 120 authors, foods trucks, activities for kids and teens, and plenty of panel discussions AND OF COURSE BOOKS for sale, courtesy of our on-site vendor, the famous Book Loft of German Village.

See you soon!

Happy Spring!

It’s here! Spring is here! On Monday, did you run outside and beat on the ground with a stick to tell the earth to wake up? And some daffodils were blooming on Monday. Did you pick one and eat it?

No? *Whew!* Good move! They’re not edible! Although someone at Ohioana did indeed eat one and nothing bad happened. It was planted on top of a mound of vanilla ice cream and hot fudge sauce (a Blooming Sundae — get it?) and she ate the bits you are supposed to eat as well.

But you needn’t feel slighted — there are plenty of other flowers to add to salads, soups, or main dishes.

In Edible Flowers: A Global History by Constance L. Kirker and former Ohio University professor Mary Newman, you can easily learn what to eat and why (Mary will be at the Ohioana Book Festival on April 8, by the way).

This nifty little book provides a history a edible plants from all over the world. It also provides a unique history of the world since plants found useful or delightful in one country are imported to other countries for propagation and use.

The book also makes the reader re-think the concept of a “flower,” which most of us consider to be a beautiful, fragrant, but perhaps useless thing. After all, what is an artichoke but the flowering part of the plant. We eat them. And the preferred part of the broccoli in North America is the stuff at the top, although some people reject the buds for the stem.

Authors Kirker and Newman always advice caution, reminding the reader that even plants considered medicinal can be bad for you if over-used. Even too much of a good thing will make you sick.

So when you’re at the garden center later this spring, you’re ready to check out with your cart full of flats of marigolds and nasturtiums, and the clerk asks you if you need some help getting them out to your car, you can say, “No thanks. I’ll just eat them here!”